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Children's Health, Wellbeing & Safety

This section is dedicated to children's health both physical and mental and to keeping children safe. 

Healthy Schools

 

As a school we feel the health,safety and wellbeing of children is paramount and we are always working to ensure that our children are educated in this subject. 

 

We have recently achieved Silver Status in the Healthy Schools initiative. 

 

Thanks to Miss Davies for working so hard on the project. We will continue to progress with our silver award action plan and will be aiming for the Gold award in the future. 

 

NewMe Local Authority Initiative

We support the local authorities new initiative called NewMe. This is not an endorsement of their activities.

 

At NewMe kids Active Alfie is here to help show how important it is to move more, so wherever you see him, you know it’s about getting active.

 

Healthy Hana is also on hand to teach you about nutrition, as making sure you eat enough of the
right foods is really important, especially for growing bodies and developing minds!

 

Make sure you check back often, as there is new content being added all the time.

 

Click the link below for more information 

The Daily Mile

We believe that children's physical and mental health is paramount to their learning and are piloting The Daily Mile with our Year 3's. We hope to roll it out across the school eventually.

 

What is The Daily Mile?

The Daily Mile is simple and free and gets children out of the classroom for fifteen minutes every day to run or jog, at their own pace, with their classmates, making them fitter, healthier, and more able to concentrate in the classroom.

 

For more info click on the link below: 

 

https://thedailymile.co.uk/

Young Carers 

We work together with Barking & Dagenham Young Carers, to support children who care for a relative.

 

They may live in a family where someone is affected by a long term illness, disability, mental health issue, alcohol or substance misuse or HIV.

 

Is young people's mental health getting worse?

 

Poor mental health among children and young people has been described as an epidemic and an "escalating crisis".

The number of children seeking help from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (Camhs) in England, has more than doubled over the past two years.

 

click the link for the latest update 

Bikeability

Year 5 children have the opportunity to take part in the bikeability program. This is run through an outside provider.

 

Bikeability is today’s cycle training programme. It’s like cycling proficiency, but better! It’s about gaining practical skills and understanding how to cycle on today’s roads. Bikeability gives everyone the skills and confidence for all kinds of cycling.

There are three Bikeability levels, each designed to improve cycling skills, no matter what is known already. Levels 1, 2 and 3 take trainees from the basics of balance and control, all the way to planning and making an independent journey on busier roads.

 

For school Bikeability courses children will be asked to bring their bikes. Training is usually split across a number of sessions in one or more weeks. Bikes need to be in a roadworthy condition. The Highway Code’s ‘Rules for cyclists’gives guidance on roadworthiness but, as a starting guide, the bike should be the right size for the trainee, have pumped up tyres and two working brakes.

 

Some Bikeability providers offer loan bikes for trainees who don’t have a suitable bike available – check with the school or Bikeability provider to see if bikes can be provided.

 

For individual courses, the instructor and trainee agree a plan for the training session and agree a meeting point. Trainees should tell the instructor what they want to learn to make sure they get the most out of their training.

 

World Mental Health Day (10 October) is a day for global mental health education, awareness and advocacy against social stigma. It was first celebrated in 1992 at the initiative of the World Federation for Mental Health, a global mental health organization with members and contacts in more than 150 countries.

 

For more information about mental health in children and adults go to: 

https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/

Personal & Online Safety 

 

What is personal safety? 

There is a lot you can do to look after yourself. In this section of the website you can learn how to spot when you are in danger; these are called your early warning signs. You can also learn more about being assertive; this is when you stand up for yourself without being mean.

 

A technique called STOP THINK GO that you can use in tricky situations to help you see your options and make a safe choice.

 

  • Do you ever feel unsafe?
  • Do you know when your body is trying to tell you that you feel unsafe? These are your early warning signs – click here to learn more about these.
  • Do you know how to stand up for yourself without being mean? click here to learn how to play the sausage game where you practice your assertive face.
  • Do you know how to make safe choices? Click here to learn Stop Think Go – a problem solving technique.

 

What does Well-being mean?

Well-being is another name used to describe how we’re feeling in different aspects of our lives.

 

Well-being can be used to describe the different parts of you that make up the whole person and contribute to making you happy overall. These may include:

 

  • Your physical health
  • Your mental health
  • How you feel
  • How you think
  • Relationships

 

Use the Stop Think Go technique to help you make the tight choices to improve your wellbeing.

Click here for link

 

Online Safety 

 

Staying Safe Online

 

1) Don’t post any personal information online – like your address, email address or mobile number.

 

2) Think carefully before posting pictures or videos of yourself.  Once you’ve put  a picture of yourself online most people can see it and may be able to download it, it’s not just yours anymore.

 

3)  Keep your privacy settings as high as possible

 

4)  Never give out your passwords

 

5)  Don’t befriend people you don’t know

 

6) Don’t meet up with people you’ve met online.  Speak to your parent or carer about people suggesting you do

 

7)  Remember that not everyone online is who they say they are

 

8)  Think carefully about what you say before you post something online

 

9)  Respect other people’s views, even if you don’t agree with someone else’s views doesn’t mean you need to be rude

 

10) If you see something online that makes you feel uncomfortable, unsafe or worried: leave the website, turn off your computer if you want to and tell a trusted adult immediately.

 

Top 10 tips for mobile phone safety

  1. Remember if you are being bullied it isn’t your fault and there is nothing so awful that you can’t speak to someone about it.  Talk to a trusted adult at home or at school.
  2. Don’t reply to any nasty messages you receive.
  3. Don’t reply to a text from someone you don’t know.
  4. Keep the messages you have been sent so you can show them to a trusted adult and make a note of the time and date of the messages or calls you receive.
  5. Don’t answer calls from withheld numbers or numbers you don’t recognise, let it go to voicemail.
  6. Block numbers from people who are sending you nasty messages.
  7. If you are bullied repeatedly can change your number.
  8. Don’t give your mobile number to someone you don’t know.
  9. Don’t send pictures to someone you don’t know.
  10. If the problem is serious you can report it to the police, cyber mentors, or childline.http://www.thinkuknow.co.uk 

 

10 top tips if you're being bullied online

  1. Tell an adult you trust if you are being cyberbullied
  2. Don’t respond or retaliate to bullying messages  – it could make things worse
  3. Block users who send you nasty messages
  4. Save abusive emails or messages (or texts) you receive
  5. Make a note of dates and times you receive bullying messages, as well as details you have of the user’s ID and the url.
  6. Don’t pass on any cyberbullying videos or messages – this is cyberbullying
  7. If you are bullied repeatedly change your user ID, or profile,  and use a name that doesn’t give any information away about you
  8. Visit bullying.co.uk – this is a website where trained counsellors can support you if you are being bullied, either by chatting online or by calling their free helpline. You can also find some top tips on how to stay safe – http://www.bullying.co.uk/
  9. You can talk to someone at Child Line 
  10. http://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/ is another very useful website for children and young people staying safe online

 

Peer Pressure

So what does peer pressure mean?

 

This is when someone your age (a peer) pressurises you (pushes you) to do something – that may make you feel ok about it, but it also may not.

 

Our friends and the people around us at school influence us – positively and sometimes negatively.

So the question is how to deal with peer pressure and remain cool as a cucumber?

 

First

1) Stop – how are you feeling? Do you feel safe, comfortable, certain about the request?

2) Think – what are your options? what are the consequences of these options?

3) Go – make the choice which makes you feel safest, happiest and calmest.

 

Lets think of some ways of replying to a peer so that you can say no and still feel comfortable:

 

Saying No: “Sorry, man. That’s just really not my thing. You can go ahead though if you want to. I won’t judge.”

 

Dismissing the question: “No, thanks.  I’m not interested right now.”

 

Distraction:  “Hey, I almost forgot…did you hear about what happened to Jodi?” or “What about Man U and Arsenal at the weekend?”

 

Make an excuse:

– Pretend to get a phone call from your parents.

– “Remember” a date you were supposed to be going on soon.

– “Realize” how late it is and say that you’re super tired from not sleeping well the night before.

 

Turn it back on them: “If you think it’s such a good idea, you do it.”

 

FOR MORE DETAILS ON ONLINE SAFETY PLEASE SEE OUR E-SAFETY PAGE (CLICK HERE)

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